Articles

Ibrutinib and bleeding management: a Belgian expert consensus

BJH - volume 11, issue 4, june 2020

A. Janssens MD, PhD, D. Bron MD, PhD, V. Van Hende MD, V. Galle MD, K. Jochmans MD, PhD, S. Meers MD, PhD, M. André MD, PhD, M-C. Ngirabacu MD, PhD, K.L. Wu MD, B. De Prijck MD, P. Verhamme MD, PhD, C. Hermans MD, PhD

SUMMARY

In recent years ibrutinib emerged as a paradigm shifting agent in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia (WM). In clinical trials and in real-world studies ibrutinib proved to be an effective agent with an overall favourable tolerability profile. However, compared with standard chemo-immunotherapy (CIT), ibrutinib was associated with a higher incidence of clinically significant bleeding. This has been hypothesized to be linked to the platelet-specific effects of inhibiting Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK). Most bleeding events under ibrutinib are low-grade with a decreasing incidence over time. However, bleeding can have a significant impact on patients and interfere with persistence and compliance of ibrutinib treatment. Currently, no clear consensus exists on the use of ibrutinib in patients with an increased bleeding risk, on the management of ibrutinib-induced bleeding and on the use of ibrutinib around surgery or invasive procedures. In this paper, a panel of Belgian haematology and haemostasis specialists formulated practical advice on bleeding prevention and management in ibrutinib-treated patients.

(BELG J HEMATOL 2020;11(4):174–84)

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Hodgkin’s lymphoma: Belgian Hematology Society guidelines in diagnosis, treatment and follow-up

BJH - volume 9, issue 6, november 2018

V. Van Hende MD, G. Verhoef MD, PhD, S. Snauwaert MD, PhD, V. De Wilde MD, PhD, B. De Prijck MD, A. Janssens MD, PhD, M. André MD, PhD

SUMMARY

Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL) is a rare B cell malignant neoplasm affecting approximately 300 new patients in Belgium annually. This disease represents approximately 11% of all lymphomas and comprises two discrete disease entities: classical HL and nodular lymphocyte-predominant HL. In recent years, treatment of HL patients has changed tremendously due to the use of interim PET-CT scan and the appearance of new molecules. In this article, the diagnosis, staging, treatment and long-term follow-up of patients with classical HL are discussed.

(BELG J HEMATOL 2018;9(6):214–24)

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Update on therapy of relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma

BJH - volume 8, issue 2, march 2017

M-C. Vekemans MD, PhD, K. Beel MD, PhD, J. Caers MD, PhD, N. Meuleman MD, PhD, G. Bries MD, PhD, H. Demuynck MD, B. De Prijck MD, H. De Samblanx MD, A. Deweweire MD, K. Fostier MD, A. Kentos MD, PhD, P. Mineur MD, M. Vaes MD, I. Vande Broek MD, PhD, A. Vande Velde MD, J. Van Droogenbroeck MD, P. Vlummens MD, K.L. Wu MD, R. Schots MD, PhD, M. Delforge MD, PhD, C. Doyen MD, PhD, On behalf of the Multiple Myeloma Study Group of the Belgian Haematology Society (BHS)

SUMMARY

The prognosis for multiple myeloma patients has improved substantially over the past decade with the development of more effective chemotherapeutic agents and regimens that possess a high level of anti-tumour activity. However, nearly all multiple myeloma patients ultimately relapse, even those who experience a complete response to initial therapy. Management of relapsed disease remains a critical aspect of multiple myeloma care and an important area of ongoing research. This manuscript from the Belgian Haematology Society multiple myeloma subgroup provides some recommendations on the management of relapsed disease.

(BELG J HEMATOL 2017;8(2):53–65)

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PP05 The detection rate of PET/CT after co-administration of [18F]NaF and [18F]FDG is superior to the detection rate of whole-body MRI in the diagnosis of MM lesions

BJH - volume 8, issue Abstract Book BHS, february 2017

J. Caers MD, PhD, N. Withofs MD, PhD, F. Cousin , T. Tancredi , P. Simoni , B. De Prijck MD, K. Hafraoui , C. Bonnet MD, PhD, R. Heusschen PhD, V. Alvarez-Miezentseva , R. Hustinx , Y. Beguin MD, PhD

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BHS Guidelines for the treatment of Burkitt’s lymphoma

BJH - volume 6, issue 2, may 2015

C. Bonnet MD, PhD, A. Janssens MD, PhD, K.L. Wu MD, W. Schroyens MD, PhD, V. Van Hende MD, P. Heimann MD, PhD, T. Tousseyn MD, PhD, M. André MD, PhD, D. Bron MD, PhD, A. Van Hoof MD, PhD, G. Verhoef MD, PhD, B. De Prijck MD, Y. Beguin MD, PhD, D. Dierickx MD, PhD

Summary

Burkitt’s lymphoma is a rare but very aggressive non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma characterised by an isolated translocation t(8;14)(q24;q32). The sporadic form is the sub-entity most frequently encountered in Belgium. Diagnosis and initial work-up must be completed rapidly to start treatment as soon as possible. Positron emission tomography scan is useful for initial staging and to evaluate the chemosensitivity of the tumour during and after treatment. After debulking, it is recommended to add rituximab to chemotherapy. Currently intensive short-cycle and low intensity chemotherapies are two valuable options. Radiotherapy is not indicated except in case of central nervous system involvement. Patients achieving complete remission must be followed carefully during the first year to detect recurrence of the disease. More than 80% of patients sustain their remission one year following initial treatment and are considered cured. For patients in partial remission or with chemosensitive relapse, autologous stem cell transplantation is recommended following re-induction with non-cross-resistant polychemotherapy. Monitoring complete blood counts and cognitive functions is important to detect late toxicity of the applied therapies.

(BELG J HEMATOL 2015;6(2):61–9)

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Haemolytic crisis induced by rasburicase administration revealing G-6-PD deficiency

BJH - volume 6, issue 2, may 2015

S. Sid MD, C. Dugauquier MD, B. De Prijck MD, C. Bonnet MD, PhD, Y. Beguin MD, PhD

Summary

We present a patient with Burkitt’s lymphoma who suffered a severe haemolytic crisis after treatment with rasburicase. This case report underlines the high incidence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in some ethnic groups and the importance of a detailed patient and family history before starting treatment, even in case of emergency. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase is an essential enzyme since it makes the synthesis of NADPH + H from NADP possible, which determines the reducing power (NADPH) of the cell. Every defect in this physiological process, notably glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, may thus result simultaneously with the use of rasburicase in acute or chronic haemolysis according to the importance of the deficiency. Management is based on stopping the incriminated drug and on supportive therapy consisting of administering packed red blood cells if the anaemia is poorly tolerated.

(BELG J HEMATOL 2015;6(2): 74–8)

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P3.05 Long-term safety follow-up of a randomized trial of darbepoetin alpha and intravenous iron following autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation

BJH - volume 6, issue Abstract Book BHS, january 2015

A. Jaspers MD, PhD, prof. F. Baron , J. Maertens MD, PhD, B. De Prijck MD, R. Schots MD, PhD, C. Bonnet MD, PhD, K. Hafraoui , E. Willems MD, PhD, S. Servais MD, PhD, G. Fillet , Y. Beguin MD, PhD

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